7

ITALIAN PIZZA TECHNICAL SYMPOSIUM


From 2007 to today, Università della Pizza® has “graduated” hundreds of pizza makers and seen the launch of pizzerias all across Italy that meet good restaurant standards in terms of product and service, superimposing an offer of quality and transparency of ingredients over the quantity offered by fast food. And every year, the best of these have animated the workshops at PizzaUp.®, the first and only technical symposium on the Italian pizza. As inimitable as ever, today’s event now replaces “pizza acrobatics” with expert debate between pizza makers and experts in the fields of food, technology, raw materials, marketing and communication. Specialist debate and practical trials on some of the key elements of making excellent pizza for taste and nutrition, including: the techniques used for making dough and proving with sour dough and starter dough, which enhance the digestibility of the pizza (2007); the best flour for the taste, structure and nutrition of the base (2008); the effect of proving and maturation duration on the digestibility of the dough (2009); the effects of different flattening and cooking techniques (2010); pizza served in slices for tasting in a logical sequence according to the ingredients of the toppings (2011); 100% Italian pizza from the grain to the toppings and the Modern Italian Pizza Manifesto (in partnership with some of the biggest names in Italian food and wine journalism - 2012); the importance of nutritional makeup in pizza and how it can be interpreted for the Mediterranean diet with the use of PetraViva Bricks® germinated grains (2013).  A real revolution, not only in terms of the pizza itself as a product of Italian cuisine, but above all in the shifting attitude to pizza making, moving on from an expression of personal vanity to focus on research and continual improvement.

6

A FRESH IDEAS GYMNASIUM


PizzaUp is a space for bouncing around new ideas, being inspired to consciously experience working daily with the dough and the yeasts, cooking the dough and processing the fresh ingredients to transform these various activities into specialist expertise. This in turn forms the basis of a gratifying and engaging consumer experience for the end client: one that combines knowledge with sensual gratification, the pleasure of good eating and the desire to return and repeat the experience. The initial goal of the specialist symposium on the Italian pizza was to become what it now is: a forum for conducting research and sharing ideas to bring pizza to the pinnacle of Italian cuisine. Pizza here is understood as a synthesis of experiences that unite the pizza makers with their clients through the common denominator of Italian ingredients and flavours that make up a cultural identity recognisable throughout the world. A pizza that, just like any other great dish, is great if it can transfer to the consumer the identity of the person who conceived and prepared it.

5

A FUTURISTIC LAB


PizzaUp is a workshop experience that guides pizza makers towards a common idea of quality, understood as the ability to select ingredients, prepare them well, explain them to the consumer revealing the origins of the dish and involving them in a consumer experience that goes beyond the simple act of eating.  Since the first PizzaUp, and for the first time in the world of the Italian pizza, people have been talking about stone-ground flour and sour dough (live for taste and lightness), fresh, seasonal ingredients, not simply thrown in excess over tasteless bases with no structure, presentation for pizza makers working in full view of diners, a menu with fewer pizzas and higher quality, and how to build up flavour that does not confuse the palate with senseless mixtures.

4

A MANIFESTO


In the 2012 edition, the sixth, we opened a new chapter on communicating these values, with taste as the means and nutritional quality as the objective.  After years of experience and sharing ideas, the pizza makers and PizzaUp specialists drew up the outlines of a contemporary vision for Italian pizza, with the fundamental contribution of ideas from nine important figures from the Italian food and wine sector.  Thus, on 7 November 2012, the Modern Italian Pizza Manifesto was born, demonstrating the union between the knowledge of the pizza maker and the sensory engagement of the consumer: a simple way of accessing Italian cuisine, suitable for all budgets. Healthy, tasty, characterised by their diversity and all united by the idea of a standard of quality that starts with ingredient shopping and arrives intact on the plate.  As for the nationality of pizza, this is finally, thanks to Petra, 100% Italian, even down to the grain.

3

ITALIAN PIZZA


TRADITIONAL INGREDIENTS IN A CONTEMPORARY LIGHT

Participating in PizzaUp means experiencing three days of working closely in a team with specialists in dough, yeast and food, together with food and wine journalists. To overcome the limits of regionalism and interpret the various traditions of Italian cuisine through pizza. All of this in light of contemporary nutritional knowledge, naturally. This does not mean abandoning tradition, but bringing tradition to everyone’s plate, including the ever increasing section of consumers who are embracing the life style of the modern Mediterranean diet. Both in Italy and abroad.

ITALIAN QUALITY


FLOUR FOR TO THE MEDITERRANEAN DIET

LESS FLOUR AND MORE WHOLEGRAIN, i.e. less carbohydrate and more fibre. And then more protein, less fat, less salt and no added yeast, for a calorie count of under 600 calories. And for the toppings, ingredients from the Mediterranean diet according to the new food pyramid. And with the new germinated PetraViva Bricks, the dough has an increased yield of natural, more bioavailable nutrition without impacting on taste. Because an understanding of tradition that considers recipes to be set in stone, even when they fall short of the nutritional profile, is the most dangerous enemy of tradition as a whole (comprised of ingredients, customs, rituals, practices, etc.).

8

2 - 3 - 4 NOVEMBER 2015

Where next for the key concepts that emerged from Expo Milan?


Ninth edition of the only specialist symposium on Italian pizza


We are half way through Expo 2015 and the key themes to emerge from this great exhibition are powerful stimuli for changing our attitude to food. But what will happen after 31 October when the spotlights on Expo go out? We will have to work to ensure that valuable ideas that have emerged over these months are transformed into new models of food consumption. The first Italian pizza event in the world after Expo will be the ninth edition of PizzaUp (2, 3 and 4 November), the specialist symposium organised by the Università della Pizza, which in recent years has been giving one of the best known Italian dishes in the world a modern makeover. PizzaUp’s work and the courses offered by Università della Pizza have created a new kind of pizza makers: these pizzaioli are immediately recognisable from the care they take in choosing their ingredients and processing the dough and yeast, to their cooking methods that respect both flavour and nutritional components, and the way they present and serve the finished product to the client. Nutrition, Energy and Earth are the cornerstones of a more responsible approach to the way we eat every day. The next PizzaUp will embrace these themes, using the popularity of pizza and the highly developed knowledge and skills of the pizza makers to spread the word and, to use a phrase coined by the industry press, reinterpret this firm favourite in a “gourmet key”. We will be reviving the key ideas of knowing where your food’s ingredients have come from and who produced them (EARTH), the fight against food waste and the responsible consumption of our food’s energy (ENERGY), and the concept of “taste education” as a key to nourishing ourselves without waste (NUTRITION). These are three seeds of change clearly expressed in the Modern Italian Pizza Manifesto, written by some of the most important names the Italian food world and presented at the 2012 edition of PizzaUp. Piero Gabrieli on Identità di Pizza, 27 July 2015


riprese e montaggio di Elvio Gorelli - PizzaUp 2013


le edizioni precedenti | atti 2013

2


PIZZAUP: KEY CONCEPTS



Monday 2 November 2015

PIZZA
AND NUTRITION

Educating people about taste is the key to nutrition without waste.

Respecting the energy we consume in our food is a duty all of us can carry out with simple everyday actions: an intelligent approach to nutrition means eating the amount that is right for our own lifestyle without the “energy waste” that can make us overweight. Food is wasted when it is thrown away, but also when it is used for means other than nutritive i.e. preserving physical and psychological energy for ourselves. We will be starting with a popular dish like pizza and demonstrating that knowing how to select and process the ingredients correctly gives rise to a product that tastes good, and enjoying the flavours in our food teaches us to eat better and less, thereby avoiding waste in the form of discarded food or excess food that is transformed into harmful body fat.


Tuesday 3 November 2015

PIZZA
AND ENERGY

The fight against food waste and the responsible consumption of food energy.

Nature transforms energy from the earth into the energy in our food. How we work the earth and raise livestock is the defining factor in the form this energy takes. The energy in our food, which has come from the earth, must be used in the awareness that its quantity is limited like other forms of energy. The fight against food waste is one of the most important levers that food specialists must use in contributing to the nutritional education of the final consumer, building up recipes and refining the techniques for processing ingredients that reduce waste to a minimum.

Wednesday 4 November 2015

PIZZA
AND EARTH

Direct knowledge about where ingredients come from and who produces them.

Bringing the final consumer closer to the earth is important because understanding food quality comes through knowing who produced the basic ingredients and how they were produced. All cooking ingredients have a more or less direct link with the earth. For this reason, educating people about more conscious eating is developed along the way from the earth to table. Food professionals have the job of reconnecting with the earth in order to reconnect consumers with the origins of the ingredients in their food and the knowledge of their nutritional potential.


WORKS SCHEDULE



Monday 2 November 2015



10:45
Participant registration

11:30 Chiara QUAGLIA
Opening presentation for the ninth edition

12:00 Piero GABRIELI
The three themes for PizzaUp 2015: NUTRITION ENERGY EARTH

12:30 LUNCH IN THE MILL
Welcome buffet

13:30 Heinz BECK - COOKING AND NUTRITION
Shared thoughts and experiences from the Chef. Critical response from Paolo Massobrio. Presented by Francesca Romana Barberini.

14:30 Heinz BECK - NEW TECHNIQUES FOR PIZZA MAKING
The Chef presents his choice of ingredients for the pizza on the theme of the day to the team of pizza makers, as well as the processing techniques to be used in the ensuing team task.

15:30
IN THE KITCHEN (only for the team working with the Chef)
formulating the recipe for the pizza topping based on the ingredients chosen by the cook; making four variations to go with four different types of dough and cooking methods.
WORKSHOP (for the teams not working with the chef)
Seminars and new ideas on the theme of the day

19:00 COOKING TEST
The team working with the Chef prepares the four pizzas developed during their kitchen session live and serves them up in a tasting session for all the participants, introducing each dish for the judges with an explanation of the reasoning behind each of the four pizzas to demonstrate how they relate to the theme of the day.

20:30 CHEF'S PASTRY BY MASTER CORRADO ASSENZA
A fine pasto to round off the meal, made on the spot with the same ingredients as the pizzas as an example of dynamic pastry making that goes beyond the confines of the kitchen.



THE SPEAKERS

in line-up order Monday 2 November



Chiara QUAGLIA

Co-founder of Università della Pizza™ and PizzaUp™.

Will open the symposium with the latest news for 2016 for the participants.

Piero GABRIELI

Co-founder of Università della Pizza™ and PizzaUp™.

Will introduce the symposium’s three themes, along with the works schedule and explain the “whys” behind the speakers’ choices.

Heinz BECK

Chef at La Pergola restaurant in Rome (3 Michelin stars)

Will present his work on the links between cooking and nutrition. Will lead a practical session on new pizza-making techniques.

Paolo MASSOBRIO

Journalist and director of the Golosario guide to Italian food and drink.

Will share his critical opinion on the themes addressed by the Chef and ask questions.

Francesca R.BARBERINI

Television presenter.

Will accompany the Chef in presenting the subject, intervening with questions and exemplifications.

Corrado ASSENZA

Master Pastry Chef.

Will interpret the day’s theme with a pastry recipe made with one or more of the ingredients chosen by the Chef and used for the pizza.

Tuesday 3 November 2015



09:00
Participant registration

09:30 GRAINS: MYTHS, LEGENDS AND MISINFORMATION
Chemist Dario Bressanini, science writer and populariser, who in his latest book “Contro Natura” clarifies what the attributes of grain really mean for us: a question that has been distorted by marketing campaigns and trends of opinion void of historical or scientific foundation.

11:00 Nicola PORTINARI - COOKING AND ENERGY
Pensiero ed esperienze dello Chef. Replica critica di Paolo Marchi. Conduce Lisa Casali.

12:00 Nicola PORTINARI - TECNICHE NUOVE PER LA PIZZA
Shared thoughts and experiences from the Chef. Critical response from Paolo Marchi. Presented by Lisa Casali.

13:00 LUNCH IN THE MILL
Midday buffet

14:00
IN THE KITCHEN (only for the team working with the Chef)
formulating the recipe for the pizza topping based on the ingredients chosen by the cook; making four variations to go with four different types of dough and cooking methods.
WORKSHOP (for the teams not working with the chef)
Seminars and new ideas on the theme of the day

18:00 COOKING TEST
The team working with the Chef prepares the four pizzas developed during their kitchen session live and serves them up in a tasting session for all the participants, introducing each dish for the judges with an explanation of the reasoning behind each of the four pizzas to demonstrate how they relate to the theme of the day.

19:30 CHEF'S PASTRY BY MASTER CORRADO ASSENZA
A fine pasto to round off the meal, made on the spot with the same ingredients as the pizzas as an example of dynamic pastry making that goes beyond the confines of the kitchen.



THE SPEAKERS

In line-up order Tuesday 3 November



Dario BRESSANINI

Chemist and researcher at the department of Chemical and Environmental Science at the University of Insubria in Como.

Will give a presentation on the false myths of “natural” and “healthy” foods./p>

Nicola PORTINARI

Chef at LA PECA restaurant in Lonigo (2 Michelin stars)

Will present his work on the links between cooking and the fight against food waste. Will lead a practical session on new pizza-making techniques.

Paolo MARCHI

Journalist and founder of Identità Golose.

Will share his critical opinion on the themes addressed by the Chef and take questions.

Lisa CASALI

Environmental scientist and sustainable food specialist.

Will accompany the Chef in presenting the subject, intervening with questions and exemplifications.

Corrado ASSENZA

Master Pastry Chef.

Will interpret the day’s theme with a pastry recipe made with one or more of the ingredients chosen by the Chef and used for the pizza.

Ambrogina PAGANI

Full professor of the Food, Nutritional and Environmental Sciences Diploma at the University of Milan.

Live sour dough and biodiversity: presenting the branding project for the live sour doughs used in pizza dough and samples for analysis.

Wednesday 4 November 2015



8:30
Participant registration

09:00 WHERE NEXT FOR PIZZA...
Enzo Vizzari, journalist and director of Le Guide dell’Espresso, shares his thoughts on possible scenarios that the new ways of making and thinking about pizza open up for Italian cuisine.

10:00 Piergiorgio PARINI - COOKING AND EARTH
Shared thoughts and experiences from the Chef. Critical response from Federico De Cesare Viola. Presented by Eleonora Cozzella.

11:00 Piergiorgio PARINI - NEW TECHNIQUES FOR PIZZA MAKING
The Chef presents his choice of ingredients for the pizza on the theme of the day to the team of pizza makers, as well as the processing techniques to be used in the ensuing team task.

12:00
IN THE KITCHEN (only for the team working with the Chef)
formulating the recipe for the pizza topping based on the ingredients chosen by the cook; making four variations to go with four different types of dough and cooking methods.
WORKSHOP (for the teams not working with the chef)
Seminars and new ideas on the theme of the day

15:30 COOKING TEST
The team working with the Chef prepares the four pizzas developed during their kitchen session live and serves them up in a tasting session for all the participants, introducing each dish for the judges with an explanation of the reasoning behind each of the four pizzas to demonstrate how they relate to the theme of the day.

17:00 CHEF'S PASTRY BY MASTER CORRADO ASSENZA
A fine pasto to round off the meal, made on the spot with the same ingredients as the pizzas as an example of dynamic pastry making that goes beyond the confines of the kitchen.

17:30 CLOSING THE SYMPOSIUM
Reading the results of the judges’ vote and anticipating the theme of PizzaUp 2016.



THE SPEAKERS

n line-up order Wednesday 4 November



Enzo VIZZARI

Journalist, director of Guide dell' Espresso

Will share his thoughts on the new position of Italian pizza in the world.

Piergiorgio PARINI

Chef at the POVERO DIAVOLO restaurant in Torriana (1 Michelin star)

Will present his work on the links between cooking and the earth. Will lead a practical session on new pizza-making techniques.

Federico DE CESARE VIOLA

Journalist and Professor of Masters studies in the food and wine sector.

Will share his critical opinion on the themes addressed by the Chef and take questions.

Eleonora COZZELLA

Journalist in the Espresso Editorial Group

Will accompany the Chef in presenting the subject, intervening with questions and exemplifications.

Corrado ASSENZA

Master Pastry Chef.

Will interpret the day’s theme with a pastry recipe made with one or more of the ingredients chosen by the Chef and used for the pizza.

Ambrogina PAGANI

Full professor of the Food, Nutritional and Environmental Sciences Diploma at the University of Milan.

Live sourdough and biodiversity: presenting the branding project for the live sour doughs used in pizza dough and samples for analysis.

1

THE TEAMS’ PIZZAS

The dough recipes were developed by the Università della Pizza unless otherwise specified. The score for the pizzas was established by voting carried out during the taste sessions by the PizzaUp judges i.e. the chef on the day and the attending journalists.



THE WINNING PIZZA

according to the judges (the chef and journalists)



Petra 9 Tutto Grano wholegrain dough
THEME ENERGY
Ingredients chosen by Chef Nicola Portinari

artichoke cream, Parmesan mayonnaise, artichoke segments, rosy lard and pepper

READ THE RECIPE
interpretation of the theme 87% | structure-cooking-taste balance 96% | twitter 118

recipe and preparation make up part of the tasting session arranged by the NUTRITION team:

Emiliano AURELI
Michele BASSO
Renato BOSCO
Renato BUSA
Michele CRESTANI
Santino COSTARELLA
Claudio DELLI POGGI
Andrea B.GIORDANO
Carlo LAIBANTI
Luca MAZZONETTO
Vittorio NASTI
Marina ORLANDI

Paolo PANNACCI
Antonio PAPPALARDO
Massimiliano PRETE
Gabriele TONTI
Riccardo SCAIOLI
Antonio SCIANNAMEA
Vincenzo VALVO
Mauro VETTORETTO
Patrick ZANONI


Artichoke cream, Parmesan mayonnaise, artichoke segments, rosy lard and pepper on a Petra 9 Tutto Grano wholegrain base.
Ingredients chosen by Chef Nicola Portinari pizza made by the team assigned the theme of ENERGY

interpretation of the theme 87% | structure-cooking-taste balance 96%




0

FUTURE AND TRADITION IN PIZZA DOUGHS

The true basic ingredient of a good dough is the grain and not the flour. Flour is part of the grain that can be used to make dough, and the work of a good miller is to select the most suitable cereals for every type of dough and grind them cleanly and consistently. The knowledge of the variety of seeds and cultivation is essential, along with the ability of the mill to separate the different parts of the grain. Only an excellent wheat will produce a good pizza dough, poor nutritional profile means poor taste. In the same way, the correct processing techniques and the use of the right yeasts will "naturally" provide the pizza bases with the characteristics of structure and firmness suitable for the various regional forms. In a world where war has been declared on food waste, there is no room for food products that are not both tasty and healthy. Take pizza and focaccia, for example: the per-capita consumption of pizza and its variants is almost daily, if we consider both home and out-of-home dining. Pizza can be seen as an efficient means of transport for the nutrients we need to be healthy. Consuming an average portion of pizza can cause swelling of the stomach, thirst and a sense of heaviness in the legs. Equally, on the contrary, it can prolong the sense of fullness, increasing the digestive period and giving strength to the whole organism for a longer period. This is why the doughs for the pizza made with Petra were chosen in a comparison with other flour products made from common wheat during the second edition of PizzaUp®. Its distinctive flavour comes from the higher content of dietary fibre that it contains, due to the presence of all the parts of the grain, and produces the double effect of requiring fewer condiments and ingredients (because the dough has its own flavour) and helps reduce the glycaemic index of the pizza (higher content of dietary fibre). From today, these two effects can be maximised by using the new PetraViva® Bricks. These contain wholegrain cereals or isolated parts of the grain, natural or toasted to improve shelf life, seeds and legumes (whole or ground into flour) and live sour doughs, designed for people who want to create their own flour in infinite combinations of flavour and nutritional profile. This has the added advantage of making pizza and focaccia into vehicles for the nutrients from flours or seeds other than common wheat and reinstating the use of traditional ingredients, but in a modern light. We are starting from scratch: the flour no longer comes from the mill, but each of us makes it ourselves, combining a Petra base with one or more of the Bricks from PetraViva® based on the nutritional profile and flavour that we want for our pizza dough. It is the germinated product that gives our bread, pizza, fresh pasta and pastries the most complete and bioavailable nutritional content. The bioavailability (meaning the proportion of the nutrition absorbed in digestion and used for the normal functioning of the body) of vitamins and mineral salts increases significantly if cereals and legumes undergo a process of assisted germination before being consumed.

THERE’S TRADITION AND TRADITION

The tradition of the ingredients in cooking is different from the tradition of the recipes and dishes. The tradition of using certain ingredients is perpetuated through innovation in the recipes, so that recipes must be adapted to the contemporary diet (current life style) to ensure that the ingredients do not fall into disuse. The need to update our recipes is linked to our changing life styles, which, in advanced economies like ours, are naturally characterised by reduced activity and an excess of calories from our food. Moving closer to the Mediterranean Diet also means consuming calories in proportion to how much we move. Pizza is an example of this and cannot be exempt from the process of redefining quality. Making dough from flour that contains all parts of the grain with the best yeast and little salt, giving the right amount of time for the dough to mature, selecting the type and quantity of the ingredients and condiments for the topping in line with the new food pyramid: these are the steps for transforming a pizza, or the sharing of pizzas, into a main meal that is also healthy.

THE MEDITERRANEAN DIET

DIET = LIFE STYLE: the word “diet” derives from the Greek δίαιτα (diaita), which means life, and therefore way of living, standard of life and set of rules conducive to health. The Mediterranean Diet is a nutritional model inspired by the traditional diets of four countries in the Mediterranean basin: Italy, Greece, Spain and Morocco. This nutritional model was abandoned in the economic boom years of the sixties and seventies, because it was considered too poor and unappealing compared to other diets, but now the Mediterranean Diet is recapturing consumer interest and gaining increasing ground. The Mediterranean Diet is part of humanity’s heritage: recognition of this important concept, ... enables us to acknowledge the wonderful and healthy natural spread of the Mediterranean lifestyle as an example of world-class excellence. The word “diet” has its roots in the Greek word for “life style”, that is, all of the practices, representations, expressions, knowledge, skills and cultural spaces from which the populations of the Mediterranean have created and recreated over the centuries a synthesis of cultural environments, social structures, and the religious and mythological universe surrounding food. The prestigious UNESCO list that compiles the elements of non-physical cultural heritage considered to be representative of humanity was made up of 166 elements (including Argentinian Tango and Chinese calligraphy) of which two were Italian: Sicilian Opera dei Pupi puppet theatre and Sardinian Canto a tenore pastoral singing. The Mediterranean Diet is the third Italian element to join the list. (source: www.unesco.it). The Mediterranean Diet constitutes a set of skills, knowledge, practices and traditions from the landscape to the table, including the crops, harvesting, fishing, conservation, processing, preparation and, particularly, consumption of food. At the heart of the Mediterranean Diet is a nutritional model that has remained unchanged through time and space, based mainly on olive oil, grains, fresh or dried fruit, vegetables, a moderate amount of fish, dairy and meat and many different condiments and spices, all accompanied by wine or infusions, depending on the traditions of each community. (source: www.unesco.it).

BETWEEN WEB AND REALITY

In an age where experiences are becoming increasingly removed from the physical world, eating both at home and out is becoming a more engaging and richer experience. Like when we find ourselves with one hand in plaster and realise all of the actions that we unconsciously use our hands for every day. More and more, we want to nourish ourselves with more sense without sacrificing taste, rather than eating simply to satisfy the instinct of hunger. The internet is not yet capable of satisfying all of the five senses and therefore traps us in a virtual reality that stimulates “continual imaginings” without really satisfying our sense organs. Smell and taste in particular need chemical stimulation to be activated, and the sense of touch in reality produces effects and receives stimulation in a very different way from our fingers on the keyboard or mouse. This is why there is an increasing need for conscious eating, pushing all of us to focus our attention on the details of food to adequately stimulate our senses of taste and smell. Not forgetting that sight and sound have the order, cleanness and logic of the internet as their frames of reference.

CONSCIOUS EATING

As our experiences become more virtual, to the detriment of movement, our daily requirement of calories is reduced. A large proportion of the population should be eating less in terms of quantity. At the same time the quality of food must improve for all restoring what was lost in the process of refining ingredients over the last 50 years. From a social perspective, to be an advocate and promoter of a healthy diet means perpetuating Italian food culture by rediscovering traditional ingredients reformulating recipes to modern nutritional standards with the use of modern techniques and technologies. That is to say, for example, that traditional pizza is not the pizza of 30 or 50 years ago, but pizza made with ingredients of which the tradition, preparation and quantities have been adapted over time to meet the nutritional requirements of people today (fewer calories per meal, less fat, less sugar, less salt, lower glycaemic index, more fibre and vitamins that are lacking from a diet the contains too many refined ingredients). Thus, pizza can be transformed from fast-food product, often very high in calories and low in useful nutrients, into one of the main meals of the Mediterranean Diet to be eaten out, that respects the proportions of the new food pyramid with a calorie count in line with the age and activity level of the consumer. In an better world, food professionals (cooks, pizza makers, bakers, pastry chefs) are building food models for consumers based on providing healthy eating experiences for when they are out, in order to teach healthy eating in the home. A valuable and essential contribution to spreading a life style that helps to combat the rise of disease in those at risk. In order for the process to become self sustaining, food professionals must create and share simplified recipes to prepare at home and sell the respective ingredients, so that the direct experience of the consumer when making their own food helps them to develop the ability to recognise healthy food when they are out.

THE “CONTEMPORARY” ITALIAN PIZZA

In the Mediterranean Diet, foods based on whole grains and legumes can becomes the main vehicles for protein, vitamins, fibre and mineral salts, which is why they form the base of the food pyramid, even in its new and current formulation. The combination of grains and legumes improves the biological value of the proteins that they contain, reducing the discrepancy compared to those from meat. A food model in line with the Mediterranean Diet contains on average: ◦ 55-65% carbohydrate, of which 90% is complex sugar (wholemeal bread, pasta, corn, rice, etc.) and about 10% simple sugar. ◦ 10-15% protein of which 2/3 is animal protein (white meats, fish, eggs, dairy, etc.) and 1/3 is plant protein (grains, pulses, etc). ◦ 25-30% fat (extra-virgin olive oil, dried fruit, fish, etc.). The recipe for a healthy and tasty pizza must be based on this nutritional formula if it is to fulfil the role of one of the main meals in our diet. Not forgetting the total calories that, for a moderately active adult person, are around 2000 kcal/day spread over the two main meals, as well as breakfast, snacks and a mid-morning bite.

THE MANIFESTO

Since PizzaUp® first launch in 2007, it has served as a place for debate and contact between pizza professionals from all over Italy, led by a team of experts in exploring the knowledge of the changing world of dough, structure and ingredients for Italian pizzas. The drafting of the Modern Italian Pizza Manifesto in partnership with some of the biggest names in Italian food and wine journalism came in 2012. This was an achievement that championed the two sides of pizza making in equal measure: taste and nutrition. PizzaUp® has always been a team effort: farmers, millers, pizza makers, chefs, nutritionists, and academic experts in yeast and dough have over the years demonstrated that pizza can become a tasty and complete meal in line with a healthy Mediterranean diet. It is down to the pizza maker to choose the right path between tradition and modernity, putting the quality of the product before their own self image. The Manifesto pushes us towards a contemporary interpretation of Italian pizza, as an emerging emblem for a better focus on personal health starting with correct nutrition.

  • 2013 EDITION
SOCIAL

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